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Agapanthus praecox mix Lilly family - pack of seeds

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I doubt that there is a South African gardener alive that has not come across an agapanthus somewhere!

Agapanthus is a very variable genus, yet they are all broadly similar in appearance, with rhizomatous roots, strap-like leaves and an umbellate inflorescence on a stalk held above the leaves

Agapanthus praecox Willd.

Family: Agapanthaceae

Common names: common agapanthus, blue lily (Eng.); bloulelie, agapant (Afr.); isicakathi (Xhosa); ubani (Zulu)

I doubt that there is a South African gardener alive that has not come across an agapanthus somewhere! They line our roads, and are in most gardens and parks, from the tall globular-headed ones to the ever-shrinking dwarf cultivars now available at garden centres. Most of the agapanthus that are grown are cultivars or hybrids of Agapanthus praecox.

Agapanthus praecox subsp.orientalis

Description

Agapanthus is a very variable genus, yet they are all broadly similar in appearance, with rhizomatous roots, strap-like leaves and an umbellate inflorescence on a stalk held above the leaves. Botanists have always found it tricky to classify them into distinct species. Frances Leighton revised the genus in 1965, recognizing ten species in total: four evergreen species, viz. A. africanus, A. comptonii, A. praecox and A. walshii and six deciduous species, viz. A. campanulatus, A. caulescens, A. coddii, A. dyeri, A. inapertus and A. nutans. Zonneveld & Duncan (2003), using nuclear DNA content and pollen vitality and colour, as well as morphology, now consider A. comptonii to be identical to A. praecox subsp. minimusA. walshii to be a subspecies of A. africanusA. dyeri to be identical to A. inapertus subsp. intermedius; and A. nutans to be identical to A caulescens. As a result there are now only two evergreen species i.e. A. africanus and A. praecox and four deciduous species i.e. A. campanulatus, A. caulescens, A. coddii and A. inapertus, making six species in total.

Form of A. praecox subsp.minimus, previously called A.comptonii

The evergreen species come from the winter rainfall Western Cape and all-year rainfall Eastern Cape and shed a few of their old outer leaves every year and replace them with new leaves from the apex of the growing shoot. The deciduous species come from the summer rainfall Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Swaziland, Free State, Lesotho, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and Mozambique, and grow rapidly in spring with the onset of the rains, and then lose their leaves completely and lie dormant during winter. Deciduous species covered on this website to date include A. coddii, and A. inapertus with its dark blue clone 'Graskop'.

Agapanthus praecox, one of the evergreens, is an extremely variable species consisting of three subspecies: subsp. praecox, subsp. orientalis and subsp. minimus. It can be recognized by its 6-20 leaves per individual plant. These leaves are strap-like and may be leathery or flaccid, narrow or broad, short or long and have blunt or pointed tips. Although this description is very broad, it is relatively easy to tell it apart from the other evergreen species: A. africanus is restricted to Western Cape, mainly from the Cape Peninsula to Paarl and Stellenbosch, and as far eastwards as Swellendam. Its range does not overlap with that of A. praecox. It is small, 250 to 700 mm, flowers in late summer (December to April) and its perianth is thick or fleshy in texture and the leaves are leathery.

Many gardeners and even some authors of publications mistakenly call the agapanthus in cultivation A. africanus. This is almost certainly incorrect. A. africanus is a winter rainfall plant and is difficult in cultivation, needing very well-drained soil, hot, dry summers and wet winters. Practically all the evergreen agapanthus in cultivation in the world, are hybrids or cultivars of A. praecox.

Agapanthus africanus on Table Mountain in January.

Agapanthus species are easily able to hybridize with each other, particularly when grown in close proximity and as a result, a bewildering array of garden hybrids have arisen. At Kirstenbosch in addition to having many examples of the pure, wild-collected Agapanthus species on display, we have a number of different forms of the species, both of garden origin and wild-collected. Those that we have for A. praecox are shown below.

Distribution and habitat

Agapanthus praecox subsp. praecox occurs in Eastern Cape. It is generally 0.8 to 1 m tall and flowers in mid to late summer (December - February). It is distinguished from the other two subspecies by its longer perianth segments (50 mm or longer) and fewer leaves (10-11 per plant) which are leathery and suberect

The genus Agapanthus was established by L'Heritier in 1788. It used to be included in the Liliaceae (lily family), was then moved to the Amaryllidaceae (amaryllis and daffodil family), moved again into the Alliaceae (onion family) then back to Amaryllidaceae and now resides in its own family, the Agapanthaceae.

Shipping
 Orders over R600 Free Shipping 2 - 9 working days. There can on very rare occasions be customs or unforeseen courier delays. Both locally and abroad. All orders are sent with a courier, indigenous seeds can be sent with registered post to the local post office. Please note : Indigenous seeds can have a delay of up to 3 weeks. 

   

Local products 1 - 9 days delivery. We cannot be held responsible for courier delays. We buy in bulk and offer wholesale prices direct to the public to bring the best offers and the lowest prices.

Returns are easy, simply contact us for a returns number and send your item to our returns centre for fast processing. We'll get you a replacement or refund in a snap!

Here are 5 more great reasons to buy from us:

so
   

You get a full 15 days to return your item to us. If it is in original, unused condition send it back to us and we'll cheerfully refund you every cent.

Returns are easy, simply contact us for a returns number and send your item to our returns centre for fast processing. We'll get you a replacement or refund in a snap!

In the unlikely event that you find your item cheaper at another online store, just let us know and we'll beat the competitor's pricing hands-down.

We insist that you love everything you buy from us. If you're unhappy for any reason whatsoever, just let us know and we'll bend over backwards to make things right again.

Ordering from Seedleme is 100% safe and secure so you can rest easy. Your personal details are never shared, sold or rented to anyone either.

I doubt that there is a South African gardener alive that has not come across an agapanthus somewhere!

Agapanthus is a very variable genus, yet they are all broadly similar in appearance, with rhizomatous roots, strap-like leaves and an umbellate inflorescence on a stalk held above the leaves

Agapanthus praecox Willd.

Family: Agapanthaceae

Common names: common agapanthus, blue lily (Eng.); bloulelie, agapant (Afr.); isicakathi (Xhosa); ubani (Zulu)

I doubt that there is a South African gardener alive that has not come across an agapanthus somewhere! They line our roads, and are in most gardens and parks, from the tall globular-headed ones to the ever-shrinking dwarf cultivars now available at garden centres. Most of the agapanthus that are grown are cultivars or hybrids of Agapanthus praecox.

Agapanthus praecox subsp.orientalis

Description

Agapanthus is a very variable genus, yet they are all broadly similar in appearance, with rhizomatous roots, strap-like leaves and an umbellate inflorescence on a stalk held above the leaves. Botanists have always found it tricky to classify them into distinct species. Frances Leighton revised the genus in 1965, recognizing ten species in total: four evergreen species, viz. A. africanus, A. comptonii, A. praecox and A. walshii and six deciduous species, viz. A. campanulatus, A. caulescens, A. coddii, A. dyeri, A. inapertus and A. nutans. Zonneveld & Duncan (2003), using nuclear DNA content and pollen vitality and colour, as well as morphology, now consider A. comptonii to be identical to A. praecox subsp. minimusA. walshii to be a subspecies of A. africanusA. dyeri to be identical to A. inapertus subsp. intermedius; and A. nutans to be identical to A caulescens. As a result there are now only two evergreen species i.e. A. africanus and A. praecox and four deciduous species i.e. A. campanulatus, A. caulescens, A. coddii and A. inapertus, making six species in total.

Form of A. praecox subsp.minimus, previously called A.comptonii

The evergreen species come from the winter rainfall Western Cape and all-year rainfall Eastern Cape and shed a few of their old outer leaves every year and replace them with new leaves from the apex of the growing shoot. The deciduous species come from the summer rainfall Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Swaziland, Free State, Lesotho, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and Mozambique, and grow rapidly in spring with the onset of the rains, and then lose their leaves completely and lie dormant during winter. Deciduous species covered on this website to date include A. coddii, and A. inapertus with its dark blue clone 'Graskop'.

Agapanthus praecox, one of the evergreens, is an extremely variable species consisting of three subspecies: subsp. praecox, subsp. orientalis and subsp. minimus. It can be recognized by its 6-20 leaves per individual plant. These leaves are strap-like and may be leathery or flaccid, narrow or broad, short or long and have blunt or pointed tips. Although this description is very broad, it is relatively easy to tell it apart from the other evergreen species: A. africanus is restricted to Western Cape, mainly from the Cape Peninsula to Paarl and Stellenbosch, and as far eastwards as Swellendam. Its range does not overlap with that of A. praecox. It is small, 250 to 700 mm, flowers in late summer (December to April) and its perianth is thick or fleshy in texture and the leaves are leathery.

Many gardeners and even some authors of publications mistakenly call the agapanthus in cultivation A. africanus. This is almost certainly incorrect. A. africanus is a winter rainfall plant and is difficult in cultivation, needing very well-drained soil, hot, dry summers and wet winters. Practically all the evergreen agapanthus in cultivation in the world, are hybrids or cultivars of A. praecox.

Agapanthus africanus on Table Mountain in January.

Agapanthus species are easily able to hybridize with each other, particularly when grown in close proximity and as a result, a bewildering array of garden hybrids have arisen. At Kirstenbosch in addition to having many examples of the pure, wild-collected Agapanthus species on display, we have a number of different forms of the species, both of garden origin and wild-collected. Those that we have for A. praecox are shown below.

Distribution and habitat

Agapanthus praecox subsp. praecox occurs in Eastern Cape. It is generally 0.8 to 1 m tall and flowers in mid to late summer (December - February). It is distinguished from the other two subspecies by its longer perianth segments (50 mm or longer) and fewer leaves (10-11 per plant) which are leathery and suberect

The genus Agapanthus was established by L'Heritier in 1788. It used to be included in the Liliaceae (lily family), was then moved to the Amaryllidaceae (amaryllis and daffodil family), moved again into the Alliaceae (onion family) then back to Amaryllidaceae and now resides in its own family, the Agapanthaceae.

Shipping
Orders over R600 Free Shipping 2 - 9 working days. There can on very rare occasions be customs or unforeseen courier delays. Both locally and abroad. All orders are sent with a courier, indigenous seeds can be sent with registered post to the local post office. Please note : Indigenous seeds can have a delay of up to 3 weeks.   

   

Local products 1 - 9 days delivery. We cannot be held responsible for courier delays. We buy in bulk and offer wholesale prices direct to the public to bring the best offers and the lowest prices.

Returns are easy, simply contact us for a returns number and send your item to our returns centre for fast processing. We'll get you a replacement or refund in a snap!

Here are 5 more great reasons to buy from us:

so
   

You get a full 15 days to return your item to us. If it is in original, unused condition send it back to us and we'll cheerfully refund you every cent.

Returns are easy, simply contact us for a returns number and send your item to our returns centre for fast processing. We'll get you a replacement or refund in a snap!

In the unlikely event that you find your item cheaper at another online store, just let us know and we'll beat the competitor's pricing hands-down.

We insist that you love everything you buy from us. If you're unhappy for any reason whatsoever, just let us know and we'll bend over backwards to make things right again.

Ordering from Seedleme is 100% safe and secure so you can rest easy. Your personal details are never shared, sold or rented to anyone either.

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